Ethiopia, Africa's Homeless Youth Project: 4 Million Orphans & 100,000 Homeless Youth In Addis Ababa, 3-Step Housing Approach Guided By Youth Personal Choices

The Bosco Children Project, located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, rescues children from the dangers of the street. The project provides support and educational services in addition to an outreach orientation center and a hostel for youth. Most of the youth are boys who are orphaned or live on the street.  The Bosco Children Project utilizes a three-step method to rehabilitation, including making the initial contact with the children on the streets and building a relationship in an informal manner. This includes offering youth safe accommodation at the hostel where they can access meals, warm clothing, psychosocial counseling, and basic education and literacy classes.  When children are ready, and if they choose to, they are invited to formally take part in the next part of the program, which includes personalized care through counseling and specialized skills training, such as in auto mechanics, carpentry, culinary arts, metallurgy, leather craft and more. Once training is complete, the project provides financial and career placement assistance, supporting the youth as they move on to become independent.  “In Addis Ababa alone, there are as many as 100,000 children who desperately need assistance in getting off the streets and turning their lives around,” explains Father Mark Hyde, director of Salesian Missions, the U.S. development arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco. “Because the Bosco Children Project provides the only shelter and rehabilitation center in Addis Ababa, it’s difficult to adequately address the crisis, but innovative partnerships with local and international businesses are helping Salesian missionaries ensure youth have what they need to secure a bright future.”  Through the development of these collaborative relationships with businesses and corporations in many sectors, the Bosco Children Project ensures that at-risk youth have access to education and training that gives them the skills to find and retain employment. One such collaborative relationship is between the Bosco Children Project and the TechPro2 training project.   Read the full article here

The Bosco Children Project, located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, rescues children from the dangers of the street. The project provides support and educational services in addition to an outreach orientation center and a hostel for youth. Most of the youth are boys who are orphaned or live on the street.

The Bosco Children Project utilizes a three-step method to rehabilitation, including making the initial contact with the children on the streets and building a relationship in an informal manner. This includes offering youth safe accommodation at the hostel where they can access meals, warm clothing, psychosocial counseling, and basic education and literacy classes.

When children are ready, and if they choose to, they are invited to formally take part in the next part of the program, which includes personalized care through counseling and specialized skills training, such as in auto mechanics, carpentry, culinary arts, metallurgy, leather craft and more. Once training is complete, the project provides financial and career placement assistance, supporting the youth as they move on to become independent.

“In Addis Ababa alone, there are as many as 100,000 children who desperately need assistance in getting off the streets and turning their lives around,” explains Father Mark Hyde, director of Salesian Missions, the U.S. development arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco. “Because the Bosco Children Project provides the only shelter and rehabilitation center in Addis Ababa, it’s difficult to adequately address the crisis, but innovative partnerships with local and international businesses are helping Salesian missionaries ensure youth have what they need to secure a bright future.”

Through the development of these collaborative relationships with businesses and corporations in many sectors, the Bosco Children Project ensures that at-risk youth have access to education and training that gives them the skills to find and retain employment. One such collaborative relationship is between the Bosco Children Project and the TechPro2 training project.

Read the full article here

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Washington State's National Homeless LGBTQ & Minority Youth Project: $1.5M Investment In 10 Selected Areas, 2 In South Florida (MD & PB), 80% Of Homeless Youth Are Non-White Or Biracial

A Way Home America, a national initiative to end youth homelessness, will invest $1.5 million on lowering the number of LGBTQ youth and youth of color without a place to call home.  The goal of the new “Grand Challenge” project is to help 10 cities and counties in the United States develop “targeted strategies to address the problem in their areas.”  The project will begin with five sites in 2019: Richmond, Va., Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Sacramento, Calif.; and San Francisco.  The next cohort will begin in early 2020 with Palm Beach, Fla.; Tucson-Pima, Arizona; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; and Anchorage, Alaska.  “These 10 Grand Challenge communities are committed to centering those young people most likely to experience homelessness – youth of color and LGBTQ youth – and to showing it is possible to effectively end homelessness for all young people,” said Megan Gibbard Kline, director of A Way Home America, in a statement announcing the selected communities. “They are communities unafraid of bold action and systemic change.”   Read full article here

A Way Home America, a national initiative to end youth homelessness, will invest $1.5 million on lowering the number of LGBTQ youth and youth of color without a place to call home.

The goal of the new “Grand Challenge” project is to help 10 cities and counties in the United States develop “targeted strategies to address the problem in their areas.”

The project will begin with five sites in 2019: Richmond, Va., Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Sacramento, Calif.; and San Francisco.

The next cohort will begin in early 2020 with Palm Beach, Fla.; Tucson-Pima, Arizona; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; and Anchorage, Alaska.

“These 10 Grand Challenge communities are committed to centering those young people most likely to experience homelessness – youth of color and LGBTQ youth – and to showing it is possible to effectively end homelessness for all young people,” said Megan Gibbard Kline, director of A Way Home America, in a statement announcing the selected communities. “They are communities unafraid of bold action and systemic change.”

Read full article here

Washington State's Homeless Youth Project: Joint Oversight Board Between City & County, Approves Creation Of 270 Affordable Housing Units Including 20 Safe Beds & Multiple Host Homes for Youth

A housing task force plans to set a goal to create 270 livable units by 2024 with a combination of affordable apartments and other safe places for homeless or those with low incomes.  The task force has an Oct. 1 deadline to submit its recommendation for a five-year housing plan to the county commissioners, who will review it before they consider sending it to the state Department of Commerce.  Then the real work begins.  “We didn’t come here to lose, we came here to make a difference,” task force facilitator Lizanne Coker said Wednesday.  The task force has one final meeting — at 2 p.m. Sept. 25 at the Cotton Building, 607 Water St., Port Townsend — to finalize its objectives.  The Affordable Housing and Homeless Housing task force is a subcommittee of the Joint Oversight Board, which is a collaborative effort between the county and the city of Port Townsend.  It has been getting together twice per month since June, attempting to gather data and listen to anecdotes of individual or group living situations throughout Jefferson County.  Coker thought she might be reaching a bit when she suggested 270 units, but the task force approved the objective.  She broke it down to 162 apartment units, 28 safe beds, 40 safe placements for senior citizens and 20 senior RV units, plus 20 safe beds in two host homes in addition to multiple host families for homeless youth.   Read entire article here

A housing task force plans to set a goal to create 270 livable units by 2024 with a combination of affordable apartments and other safe places for homeless or those with low incomes.

The task force has an Oct. 1 deadline to submit its recommendation for a five-year housing plan to the county commissioners, who will review it before they consider sending it to the state Department of Commerce.

Then the real work begins.

“We didn’t come here to lose, we came here to make a difference,” task force facilitator Lizanne Coker said Wednesday.

The task force has one final meeting — at 2 p.m. Sept. 25 at the Cotton Building, 607 Water St., Port Townsend — to finalize its objectives.

The Affordable Housing and Homeless Housing task force is a subcommittee of the Joint Oversight Board, which is a collaborative effort between the county and the city of Port Townsend.

It has been getting together twice per month since June, attempting to gather data and listen to anecdotes of individual or group living situations throughout Jefferson County.

Coker thought she might be reaching a bit when she suggested 270 units, but the task force approved the objective.

She broke it down to 162 apartment units, 28 safe beds, 40 safe placements for senior citizens and 20 senior RV units, plus 20 safe beds in two host homes in addition to multiple host families for homeless youth.

Read entire article here

Pennsylvania's Homeless Youth Project: $3.4 Million Federal Award, Homeless CoC 5-Year Strategic Plan Released 2017 To Reduce Homeless Unaccompanied Youth By 50%, New Funding Can Assist

A Tarentum-based domestic violence center has a number of programs that could benefit from an Allegheny County grant aimed at reducing youth homelessness.  Depending on the grant’s focus, Michelle Gibb, Alle-Kiski HOPE Center executive director, said there are different ways the grant could benefit her organization, which provides numerous homeless services supporting families such as an emergency shelter program and a rapid rehousing program.  “If it is youth 18 to 24, then we would work with the youth in securing permanent housing and then providing the supportive services necessary to keep them stably housed, and to move beyond that poverty level, looking for opportunities for retention and advancement,” Gibb said. “If it is youth homelessness under 18, then that would be any of our existing programs, our emergency shelter or rapid rehousing, working with families.”  Allegheny County received a $3.49 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program, which supports a wide range of housing programs, including rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, transitional housing and other innovative housing models, the county said in a news release.   Read the full article here

A Tarentum-based domestic violence center has a number of programs that could benefit from an Allegheny County grant aimed at reducing youth homelessness.

Depending on the grant’s focus, Michelle Gibb, Alle-Kiski HOPE Center executive director, said there are different ways the grant could benefit her organization, which provides numerous homeless services supporting families such as an emergency shelter program and a rapid rehousing program.

“If it is youth 18 to 24, then we would work with the youth in securing permanent housing and then providing the supportive services necessary to keep them stably housed, and to move beyond that poverty level, looking for opportunities for retention and advancement,” Gibb said. “If it is youth homelessness under 18, then that would be any of our existing programs, our emergency shelter or rapid rehousing, working with families.”

Allegheny County received a $3.49 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program, which supports a wide range of housing programs, including rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, transitional housing and other innovative housing models, the county said in a news release.

Read the full article here