Rural Minnesota Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: $140,000 Check Presented To Group, Last Year's Beneficiary Trained Over 25,000 Educators, Students & Parents, Bold Philanthropy Is Key

TPC ROSE, a nonprofit group of women affiliated with Tournament Players Club Twin Cities, Blaine, presented a $140,000 check Dec. 11 to its 2018 beneficiary, HOPE 4 Youth, which provides pathways to end youth homelessness in the north metro suburbs.   https://www.presspubs.com/quad/news/tpc-rose-surpasses-million-in-donations/article_f2093df2-0962-11e9-97c7-0fcb17c7e02b.html   Since forming in 2008, TPC ROSE has donated more than $1 million for area causes, including food shelves, housing, transportation, support for the terminally ill, domestic abuse prevention services and more. Funds are raised each year for the selected nonprofit primarily through a summer golf tournament and a fall gala.  Last year’s beneficiary, the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center, provided an update Dec. 11 on how TPC ROSE funds have furthered their mission of ending all forms of child maltreatment through education, training and prevention, while advocating for and serving children, adult survivors and communities.  “The partnership between the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center (JWRC) and TPC ROSE has been good for the children of Minnesota and beyond,” said Abbey Lowenstein, community outreach for JWRC. She noted training has been provided to about 25,000 students, parents, educators and community leaders, including 3,250 in Anoka County. Other trainings include personal and online safety for youth and burn-out prevention for professionals working with children.  “Our TPC ROSE members have done a phenomenal job this year,” said Sandra Crane, TPC ROSE president. “I’m so proud of how the community responded and joined us in supporting the mission of HOPE 4 Youth.”  TPC ROSE is searching for its 2019 beneficiary. The application process includes filling out a two-page form, which is reviewed by a committee. Finalists make a presentation to the full membership, which votes to select one beneficiary for the year. The application for 2019 is available at www.TPCrose.com. The deadline to apply is Jan. 15. To be eligible, the organization must be a nonprofit organization that predominately serves residents of the north metro area.

TPC ROSE, a nonprofit group of women affiliated with Tournament Players Club Twin Cities, Blaine, presented a $140,000 check Dec. 11 to its 2018 beneficiary, HOPE 4 Youth, which provides pathways to end youth homelessness in the north metro suburbs.

https://www.presspubs.com/quad/news/tpc-rose-surpasses-million-in-donations/article_f2093df2-0962-11e9-97c7-0fcb17c7e02b.html

Since forming in 2008, TPC ROSE has donated more than $1 million for area causes, including food shelves, housing, transportation, support for the terminally ill, domestic abuse prevention services and more. Funds are raised each year for the selected nonprofit primarily through a summer golf tournament and a fall gala.

Last year’s beneficiary, the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center, provided an update Dec. 11 on how TPC ROSE funds have furthered their mission of ending all forms of child maltreatment through education, training and prevention, while advocating for and serving children, adult survivors and communities.

“The partnership between the Jacob Wetterling Resource Center (JWRC) and TPC ROSE has been good for the children of Minnesota and beyond,” said Abbey Lowenstein, community outreach for JWRC. She noted training has been provided to about 25,000 students, parents, educators and community leaders, including 3,250 in Anoka County. Other trainings include personal and online safety for youth and burn-out prevention for professionals working with children.

“Our TPC ROSE members have done a phenomenal job this year,” said Sandra Crane, TPC ROSE president. “I’m so proud of how the community responded and joined us in supporting the mission of HOPE 4 Youth.”

TPC ROSE is searching for its 2019 beneficiary. The application process includes filling out a two-page form, which is reviewed by a committee. Finalists make a presentation to the full membership, which votes to select one beneficiary for the year. The application for 2019 is available at www.TPCrose.com. The deadline to apply is Jan. 15. To be eligible, the organization must be a nonprofit organization that predominately serves residents of the north metro area.

Canada Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: 655 Youth Housed By Host Home Model, 250 More Than Year Before, 20% Of Total Homeless Population Are Kids, Host Homes Are Holistic, That's Key

OneRoof Youth Services is hoping people in Waterloo region will open their doors to youth who are at risk of being homeless through a new program.   https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/oneroof-youth-services-host-homes-program-1.4966247   The Host Homes program started in early December and the goal is to match youth with a temporary home, rather than have them go to a shelter.  "When youth enter the shelter system, there is risk inherited with that and if we can divert them ahead of time, then they're in a place where we can work with them and they are safe and secure," Silvia Allard, a co-ordinator of the Host Homes program at OneRoof, told CBC News.  Youth between the ages of 16 and 25 would live at the homes between 30 to 60 days, Allard said. During that time, she and another program co-ordinator would work with them to find a permanent home, whether that's back with their family, with another relative or a friend.  In 2017, OneRoof helped 655 youth in Waterloo Region, 250 more than in 2016.  OneRoof provides youth with numerous services daily, such as meals, showers and clothing donations, but the shelter only has 17 beds available, which not enough to meet the present demand, Allard said.  "By providing host home families, with a place for [youth] to go, that enables us to get them out of the shelter system," she said.  OneRoof Youth Services on Queen Street in Kitchener provides youth with meals, showers and clothing donations and has 17 beds available. (Google Street View)  Host Home program better helps youth  Nationally, 20 per cent of the homeless population are made up of youth between the ages of 13 and 24, said John Ecker, director of research and evaluation at the Canadian Observatory of Homelessness (COH).  He said systematic issues, such as leaving the foster care system and conflict at home, are some of the elements that contribute to homelessness in young people and that the issue requires a different response.  "I think it's important to get folks to know that this isn't your stereotypical view of what homelessness may look like," he said.  Youth homelessness linked to foster care system in new study  He said the "host home" model has worked well in other cities in the U.S. and the York and Halton regions. It's also an effective program that has helped youth stay out of shelters, while also having a positive impact on youth.  "We found that young people are generally satisfied with the program, both in terms of the host home and the supports that are received from host home workers," Ecker said, adding host families also benefit as some create a positive relationship with youth.  Allard said locally, there has been a large influx of families and individuals interested in becoming host homes.  Over the next three years, COH will provide research and evaluation supports to OneRoof as the program continues.

OneRoof Youth Services is hoping people in Waterloo region will open their doors to youth who are at risk of being homeless through a new program.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/oneroof-youth-services-host-homes-program-1.4966247

The Host Homes program started in early December and the goal is to match youth with a temporary home, rather than have them go to a shelter.

"When youth enter the shelter system, there is risk inherited with that and if we can divert them ahead of time, then they're in a place where we can work with them and they are safe and secure," Silvia Allard, a co-ordinator of the Host Homes program at OneRoof, told CBC News.

Youth between the ages of 16 and 25 would live at the homes between 30 to 60 days, Allard said. During that time, she and another program co-ordinator would work with them to find a permanent home, whether that's back with their family, with another relative or a friend.

In 2017, OneRoof helped 655 youth in Waterloo Region, 250 more than in 2016.

OneRoof provides youth with numerous services daily, such as meals, showers and clothing donations, but the shelter only has 17 beds available, which not enough to meet the present demand, Allard said.

"By providing host home families, with a place for [youth] to go, that enables us to get them out of the shelter system," she said.

OneRoof Youth Services on Queen Street in Kitchener provides youth with meals, showers and clothing donations and has 17 beds available. (Google Street View)

Host Home program better helps youth

Nationally, 20 per cent of the homeless population are made up of youth between the ages of 13 and 24, said John Ecker, director of research and evaluation at the Canadian Observatory of Homelessness (COH).

He said systematic issues, such as leaving the foster care system and conflict at home, are some of the elements that contribute to homelessness in young people and that the issue requires a different response.

"I think it's important to get folks to know that this isn't your stereotypical view of what homelessness may look like," he said.

Youth homelessness linked to foster care system in new study

He said the "host home" model has worked well in other cities in the U.S. and the York and Halton regions. It's also an effective program that has helped youth stay out of shelters, while also having a positive impact on youth.

"We found that young people are generally satisfied with the program, both in terms of the host home and the supports that are received from host home workers," Ecker said, adding host families also benefit as some create a positive relationship with youth.

Allard said locally, there has been a large influx of families and individuals interested in becoming host homes.

Over the next three years, COH will provide research and evaluation supports to OneRoof as the program continues.

San Diego Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: $1.3 Million Yoga & Meditation Solutions For Housing 35 Youth, Taking An Holistic Approach Is Sustainable Housing For The Other 1,100 Homeless Youth

Yoga, meditation, acupuncture and chiropractic are not usually discussed as solutions to homelessness, but a new housing program for San Diego youth is exploring how the practices might help stabilize lives.   https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/homelessness/sd-me-homeless-youth-20190116-story.html   Eric Lovett, founder and executive director of Urban Street Angels, said the program — which he described as the first of its kind — will monitor how certain holistic practices could help people with mental health issues that often are associated with homelessness.  “We believe in a sustainable answer and not putting Band-Aids on issues, but really getting to their root cause,” he said Friday at an opening ceremony for his program’s new home in downtown San Diego. “We’re going to change the face of how we deal with mental illness, starting in San Diego.”  Formerly homeless young people who have experienced mental issues will wear Apple Watches to respond to surveys about their mental state following various holistic exercises, he said.  The participants are among 35 people ages 18 to 25 years who will be residents in the former Toussaint Academy building owned by Father Joe’s Villages on Fifth Avenue.  Homeless people in that age group, known as transitional age youth, are estimated to be about 1,100 in San Diego County.  “It’s just unacceptable,” said Chris Ward, a San Diego City Council member and chair of the Regional Task Force on Homelessness. “Now, 35 of those youths will have a safe place to be, to get well, and to begin a life plan and have a support network.”  Urban Street Angels began in 2012 with Lovett, a MissionGathering pastor at the time, handing out backpacks, socks and sleeping bags to homeless people twice a year. He soon took homeless youths into his home. He then started the business 8 West, putting the young people to work making soap and candles while helping them acquire other job skills.  In September, the program moved into dorms and office spaces in three floors of Toussaint Academy. Father Joe’s Villages had used the dorms to house homeless teenagers, but ended the residential program in 2016.  Urban Street Angels operates two housing programs in the building. A nine-month bridge housing program will have up to 15 people and a three-month “Just Be U” supportive housing program can have 20 people.  “Just Be U” is specifically for homeless youths with severe mental illness. Funding over five-years will come from an annual $1.3 million county grant which will pay for a variety of services, including yoga, Reiki and other holistic healing practices.  Nick Macchione, director and deputy chief administrative officer for county Health and Human Services Agency, said the county is investing about $8 million in all for the Urban Street Angels programs.  Autumn Rapson, 24, moved into the building in September as part of the nine-month housing program.  Originally from Waco, Texas, Rapson said she moved to San Diego when she was 18 and was homeless for a while but began living in a supportive residential program.  Around the time she learned that program was leaving the city, Rapson said, she heard a woman she described as the love of her life had killed herself in Texas. Rapson ended up in a psychiatric hospital, but then learned about Urban Street Angels.  She now has a job as a recreational therapist at a psychiatric hospital and hopes to continue work in the field. For now, she said she is comforted by the support she receives in her new home, where a case worker is one door away.  “I can’t tell you the number of times in the middle of the night they come and sit or talk to me on the phone,” she said.  Father Joe’s Villages still owns the building but is not part of Urban Street Angels, which is renting 12,000 square feet from the nonprofit.  “It’s perfect for me,” Lovett said about the program’s new home, where dorms for one to three people range in size from 200 to 300 square feet. “When I moved in here, I almost tripled our enrollment.”  Father Joe’s Villages President and CEO Deacon Jim Vargas spoke at the Friday ceremony and said he was pleased the building would continue to serve young people in need.  “We truly are at the precipice of making a tremendous difference,” Vargas said. “I think we’re making inroads with those 1,000 youths who are out on the street.”  Lovett said the need for housing and support is much greater than he is providing, but he hopes the program will grow and more partners will be found in other cities.  Friday’s ceremony included elected officials and other representatives from Chula Vista, Carlsbad, Imperial Beach, Vista and the San Diego, Sweetwater and Southwestern community college districts.

Yoga, meditation, acupuncture and chiropractic are not usually discussed as solutions to homelessness, but a new housing program for San Diego youth is exploring how the practices might help stabilize lives.

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/homelessness/sd-me-homeless-youth-20190116-story.html

Eric Lovett, founder and executive director of Urban Street Angels, said the program — which he described as the first of its kind — will monitor how certain holistic practices could help people with mental health issues that often are associated with homelessness.

“We believe in a sustainable answer and not putting Band-Aids on issues, but really getting to their root cause,” he said Friday at an opening ceremony for his program’s new home in downtown San Diego. “We’re going to change the face of how we deal with mental illness, starting in San Diego.”

Formerly homeless young people who have experienced mental issues will wear Apple Watches to respond to surveys about their mental state following various holistic exercises, he said.

The participants are among 35 people ages 18 to 25 years who will be residents in the former Toussaint Academy building owned by Father Joe’s Villages on Fifth Avenue.

Homeless people in that age group, known as transitional age youth, are estimated to be about 1,100 in San Diego County.

“It’s just unacceptable,” said Chris Ward, a San Diego City Council member and chair of the Regional Task Force on Homelessness. “Now, 35 of those youths will have a safe place to be, to get well, and to begin a life plan and have a support network.”

Urban Street Angels began in 2012 with Lovett, a MissionGathering pastor at the time, handing out backpacks, socks and sleeping bags to homeless people twice a year. He soon took homeless youths into his home. He then started the business 8 West, putting the young people to work making soap and candles while helping them acquire other job skills.

In September, the program moved into dorms and office spaces in three floors of Toussaint Academy. Father Joe’s Villages had used the dorms to house homeless teenagers, but ended the residential program in 2016.

Urban Street Angels operates two housing programs in the building. A nine-month bridge housing program will have up to 15 people and a three-month “Just Be U” supportive housing program can have 20 people.

“Just Be U” is specifically for homeless youths with severe mental illness. Funding over five-years will come from an annual $1.3 million county grant which will pay for a variety of services, including yoga, Reiki and other holistic healing practices.

Nick Macchione, director and deputy chief administrative officer for county Health and Human Services Agency, said the county is investing about $8 million in all for the Urban Street Angels programs.

Autumn Rapson, 24, moved into the building in September as part of the nine-month housing program.

Originally from Waco, Texas, Rapson said she moved to San Diego when she was 18 and was homeless for a while but began living in a supportive residential program.

Around the time she learned that program was leaving the city, Rapson said, she heard a woman she described as the love of her life had killed herself in Texas. Rapson ended up in a psychiatric hospital, but then learned about Urban Street Angels.

She now has a job as a recreational therapist at a psychiatric hospital and hopes to continue work in the field. For now, she said she is comforted by the support she receives in her new home, where a case worker is one door away.

“I can’t tell you the number of times in the middle of the night they come and sit or talk to me on the phone,” she said.

Father Joe’s Villages still owns the building but is not part of Urban Street Angels, which is renting 12,000 square feet from the nonprofit.

“It’s perfect for me,” Lovett said about the program’s new home, where dorms for one to three people range in size from 200 to 300 square feet. “When I moved in here, I almost tripled our enrollment.”

Father Joe’s Villages President and CEO Deacon Jim Vargas spoke at the Friday ceremony and said he was pleased the building would continue to serve young people in need.

“We truly are at the precipice of making a tremendous difference,” Vargas said. “I think we’re making inroads with those 1,000 youths who are out on the street.”

Lovett said the need for housing and support is much greater than he is providing, but he hopes the program will grow and more partners will be found in other cities.

Friday’s ceremony included elected officials and other representatives from Chula Vista, Carlsbad, Imperial Beach, Vista and the San Diego, Sweetwater and Southwestern community college districts.

Washington's Ending Youth Human Trafficking Project: Ranked 12th In The Nation, 800 Referrals Per Year, 90% Are U.S. Citizens, Predators Target Homeless Youth, Solutions Include The Ports & Uber

Leaders representing King County, Port of Seattle, City of Seattle, Sound Transit, Delta Air Lines, and Alaska Airlines today launched a unified public awareness campaign to stop human trafficking, encouraging survivors to call a national hotline for assistance.   https://www.kingcounty.gov/elected/executive/constantine/news/release/2019/January/18-stop-human-trafficking.aspx   It is modeled after a successful campaign led by the King County Council in 2013 that dramatically increased the number of trafficking survivors who called for resources, including medical care, financial assistance, and housing.  The campaign launched today will expand the approach to a regional scale with additional public, private, and nonprofit partners sharing resource signs at airports, buses, trains, health clinics, libraries, law enforcement offices, public defender offices, community centers, and elsewhere throughout the region.  Victims and survivors are encouraged to call the national hotline at 888-373-7888, text 233-733, or visit WATraffickingHelp.org.  “We have the dedicated employees, strong partnerships, and shared commitment needed to stop labor and sex trafficking in our region,” said King County Executive Constantine. “Human traffickers prey on people in our community who are vulnerable, specifically targeting people of color. Our united effort will connect survivors with the resources they need to break free and thrive once again.”  “We all must do our part to see an end to human trafficking. The Port of Seattle is committed to addressing this issue – leveraging our roles as a county-wide government, large employer and manager of significant trade and travel facilities,” said Port of Seattle Commissioner Courtney Gregoire. “We want to make sure that places like Sea-Tac Airport, our cruise terminals and our marinas are not used as transit points for traffickers and their victims, and we want the more than 50 million annual visitors to our facilities to join us in our fight to end trafficking here in our region.”  Other partners include Expedia Group, Uber, Lyft, the Snohomish County Lodging Association, and several King County cities.  Preying on those who are vulnerable  Contrary to the popular myth, many people who are trafficked for labor or sex are not brought here from Asia or other parts of the world. Most victims and survivors already lived in the United States but were vulnerable, with many experiencing homelessness. Victims and survivors are disproportionately people of color while the majority of people charged with trafficking are white.  According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, Washington ranked 12th among states for the highest number of signals – either phone call, email, or website form – from people who are victims of sex or labor trafficking. The national hotline has received more than 3,600 calls from people in Washington since 2007, including 266 last year. That includes people who were lured here from other countries and people who already live here and are exploited for labor or sex.  Local human service providers receive nearly 800 referrals each year.  The Bridge Collaborative – YouthCare, Friends of Youth, Nexus Youth and Families, Kent Youth and Families, and the Organizations for Prostitution Survivors – provided outreach services 212 people between the ages 12 of 24 who are either survivors of the sex trades and trafficking or at high risk to become exploited with about 90 percent of being U.S. citizens  In 2018, Washington Anti Trafficking Response Network, or WARN, received 75 referrals for sex and labor trafficking survivors with nearly 90 percent being foreign nationals.  In 2018, Real Escape from the Sex Trade, or REST, provided services to 517 survivors of the sex trade with about 90 percent being U.S. citizens.  The Port of Seattle Commission passed a motion in January 2018 directing staff to implement a port-wide anti-trafficking strategy, including the development of a trafficking awareness campaign. The King County Council passed a motion in July 2018 requesting that Executive Constantine convene a workgroup to implement a Stop Human Trafficking public awareness campaign. The three jurisdictions now comprise a formal workgroup that launched this joint Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign.  The 2013 campaign led by the King County Council resulted in a 63 percent increase in the number of people from Washington who called the national hotline.  The goals of the public awareness campaign are to raise public awareness about the nature of human trafficking, how and where it occurs locally, and how to prevent and stop it; help identify victims and survivors and promote access to services, and decrease demand through awareness.  The regional Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign plans to renew the effort each January, which is national Human Trafficking Awareness Month.

Leaders representing King County, Port of Seattle, City of Seattle, Sound Transit, Delta Air Lines, and Alaska Airlines today launched a unified public awareness campaign to stop human trafficking, encouraging survivors to call a national hotline for assistance.

https://www.kingcounty.gov/elected/executive/constantine/news/release/2019/January/18-stop-human-trafficking.aspx

It is modeled after a successful campaign led by the King County Council in 2013 that dramatically increased the number of trafficking survivors who called for resources, including medical care, financial assistance, and housing.

The campaign launched today will expand the approach to a regional scale with additional public, private, and nonprofit partners sharing resource signs at airports, buses, trains, health clinics, libraries, law enforcement offices, public defender offices, community centers, and elsewhere throughout the region.

Victims and survivors are encouraged to call the national hotline at 888-373-7888, text 233-733, or visit WATraffickingHelp.org.

“We have the dedicated employees, strong partnerships, and shared commitment needed to stop labor and sex trafficking in our region,” said King County Executive Constantine. “Human traffickers prey on people in our community who are vulnerable, specifically targeting people of color. Our united effort will connect survivors with the resources they need to break free and thrive once again.”

“We all must do our part to see an end to human trafficking. The Port of Seattle is committed to addressing this issue – leveraging our roles as a county-wide government, large employer and manager of significant trade and travel facilities,” said Port of Seattle Commissioner Courtney Gregoire. “We want to make sure that places like Sea-Tac Airport, our cruise terminals and our marinas are not used as transit points for traffickers and their victims, and we want the more than 50 million annual visitors to our facilities to join us in our fight to end trafficking here in our region.”

Other partners include Expedia Group, Uber, Lyft, the Snohomish County Lodging Association, and several King County cities.

Preying on those who are vulnerable

Contrary to the popular myth, many people who are trafficked for labor or sex are not brought here from Asia or other parts of the world. Most victims and survivors already lived in the United States but were vulnerable, with many experiencing homelessness. Victims and survivors are disproportionately people of color while the majority of people charged with trafficking are white.

According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, Washington ranked 12th among states for the highest number of signals – either phone call, email, or website form – from people who are victims of sex or labor trafficking. The national hotline has received more than 3,600 calls from people in Washington since 2007, including 266 last year. That includes people who were lured here from other countries and people who already live here and are exploited for labor or sex.

Local human service providers receive nearly 800 referrals each year.

The Bridge Collaborative – YouthCare, Friends of Youth, Nexus Youth and Families, Kent Youth and Families, and the Organizations for Prostitution Survivors – provided outreach services 212 people between the ages 12 of 24 who are either survivors of the sex trades and trafficking or at high risk to become exploited with about 90 percent of being U.S. citizens

In 2018, Washington Anti Trafficking Response Network, or WARN, received 75 referrals for sex and labor trafficking survivors with nearly 90 percent being foreign nationals.

In 2018, Real Escape from the Sex Trade, or REST, provided services to 517 survivors of the sex trade with about 90 percent being U.S. citizens.

The Port of Seattle Commission passed a motion in January 2018 directing staff to implement a port-wide anti-trafficking strategy, including the development of a trafficking awareness campaign. The King County Council passed a motion in July 2018 requesting that Executive Constantine convene a workgroup to implement a Stop Human Trafficking public awareness campaign. The three jurisdictions now comprise a formal workgroup that launched this joint Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign.

The 2013 campaign led by the King County Council resulted in a 63 percent increase in the number of people from Washington who called the national hotline.

The goals of the public awareness campaign are to raise public awareness about the nature of human trafficking, how and where it occurs locally, and how to prevent and stop it; help identify victims and survivors and promote access to services, and decrease demand through awareness.

The regional Human Trafficking Awareness Campaign plans to renew the effort each January, which is national Human Trafficking Awareness Month.