New York City (NY) Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: $128M Capital Campaign To Address The 33,000 Homeless Youth In The City, Launched With $10M Funding Check, Groundbreaking Of 88,000 SqFt New Bldg

For the first time in Covenant House’s 47-year history, the organization has launched a campaign to design and build a new residential facility for the youth overcoming homelessness in New York City. Take Notice NYC - the Campaign for the New Covenant House New York is a $128 million initiative being undertaken to address the issue of homelessness in the city that affects 33,000 youth annually. Moreover, 19% of those struggling to survive on the streets become the victims of the horrors of human trafficking.  The campaign is being launched with a $10 million gift from Strauss Zelnick and his wife, Wendy Belzberg. Zelnick, a long-standing Covenant House board member, is the founder of ZMC and chairman and CEO of Take-Two Interactive Software.  The project is an 80,000 s/f, 11-story facility that will be built on the current site of Covenant House New York. Made possible through a real estate development partnership, which was structured by Denham Wolf Real Estate Services through a planning and selection process, the purpose-built facility is being designed by FXCollaborative with further representation by Levien & Co. When complete, facility will enable the organization to provide the most effective, cutting-edge treatments and services for those in need. A ground breaking ceremony was held on September 19th.  “Covenant House New York’s new purpose-built facility supports their mission of providing homeless youth with shelter and access to support services, giving the residents opportunities to work toward stable, re-engaged lives,” said Heidi Blau, FXCollaborative’s partner-in-charge of the project.   Read full article here

For the first time in Covenant House’s 47-year history, the organization has launched a campaign to design and build a new residential facility for the youth overcoming homelessness in New York City. Take Notice NYC - the Campaign for the New Covenant House New York is a $128 million initiative being undertaken to address the issue of homelessness in the city that affects 33,000 youth annually. Moreover, 19% of those struggling to survive on the streets become the victims of the horrors of human trafficking.

The campaign is being launched with a $10 million gift from Strauss Zelnick and his wife, Wendy Belzberg. Zelnick, a long-standing Covenant House board member, is the founder of ZMC and chairman and CEO of Take-Two Interactive Software.

The project is an 80,000 s/f, 11-story facility that will be built on the current site of Covenant House New York. Made possible through a real estate development partnership, which was structured by Denham Wolf Real Estate Services through a planning and selection process, the purpose-built facility is being designed by FXCollaborative with further representation by Levien & Co. When complete, facility will enable the organization to provide the most effective, cutting-edge treatments and services for those in need. A ground breaking ceremony was held on September 19th.

“Covenant House New York’s new purpose-built facility supports their mission of providing homeless youth with shelter and access to support services, giving the residents opportunities to work toward stable, re-engaged lives,” said Heidi Blau, FXCollaborative’s partner-in-charge of the project.

Read full article here

State Of Oregon's Homeless Youth Project: $983M Additional Legislative Spending For Homelessness Including $80M For Homeless Youth Projects, Get-It-Done Senator

Oregon’s U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley today announced that the Senate Appropriations Committee has passed the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Committee bill, which includes an additional $938 million over last fiscal year to battle homelessness.  “Infrastructure and housing are pressing issues for communities across Oregon—urban and rural,” Merkley said. “As our cities and towns in every corner of the state face their biggest housing affordability crises in decades—with rents dramatically outpacing incomes—we must do everything we can to make sure families have the decent homes they deserve. This bill includes needed investments in to address the ongoing housing and homelessness crisis.”  Merkley is the only Oregon member of Congress from either chamber since Sen. Mark Hatfield to serve on the Appropriations Committee, considered to be one of the most powerful on Capitol Hill.  Key housing appropriations that will benefit Oregon include:  Community Development Block Grants: Rejecting the Trump Administration’s request to eliminate the program, Merkley successfully advocated for $3.325 billion for the Community Development Block Grant Program. This program funds vital housing rehabilitation, supportive services, public improvements and economic development projects in communities across Oregon and the nation while encouraging local investment.  Affordable Housing: As rural and urban communities across Oregon continue to experience housing crises, Merkley successfully advocated to increase for affordable housing programs for some of Oregon’s most vulnerable people—low-income families, seniors, and people with disabilities. Merkley led 27 of his colleagues in a successful effort to provide an additional $813 million for rental assistance for 1.2 million low-income households. The senator also protected funding for housing programs that benefit the elderly and people with disabilities.   Read the full article here

Oregon’s U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley today announced that the Senate Appropriations Committee has passed the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Committee bill, which includes an additional $938 million over last fiscal year to battle homelessness.

“Infrastructure and housing are pressing issues for communities across Oregon—urban and rural,” Merkley said. “As our cities and towns in every corner of the state face their biggest housing affordability crises in decades—with rents dramatically outpacing incomes—we must do everything we can to make sure families have the decent homes they deserve. This bill includes needed investments in to address the ongoing housing and homelessness crisis.”

Merkley is the only Oregon member of Congress from either chamber since Sen. Mark Hatfield to serve on the Appropriations Committee, considered to be one of the most powerful on Capitol Hill.

Key housing appropriations that will benefit Oregon include:

Community Development Block Grants: Rejecting the Trump Administration’s request to eliminate the program, Merkley successfully advocated for $3.325 billion for the Community Development Block Grant Program. This program funds vital housing rehabilitation, supportive services, public improvements and economic development projects in communities across Oregon and the nation while encouraging local investment.

Affordable Housing: As rural and urban communities across Oregon continue to experience housing crises, Merkley successfully advocated to increase for affordable housing programs for some of Oregon’s most vulnerable people—low-income families, seniors, and people with disabilities. Merkley led 27 of his colleagues in a successful effort to provide an additional $813 million for rental assistance for 1.2 million low-income households. The senator also protected funding for housing programs that benefit the elderly and people with disabilities.

Read the full article here

State Of Wisconsin's Homeless Student Project: With 18,000 Homeless Students, $7.5M Additional State Spending Over 2 Years Pending Legislation, 5,163 Homeless Students In Milwaukee District

Despite promising efforts, the relentless trauma and indignities of homelessness remain a daily reality for tens of thousands of men, women and children in Wisconsin.  In booming Madison, the homeless live out of vehicles and tents, double up in apartments or motel rooms, or sleep outside on streets lined with posh bars and restaurants surrounding the majestic glow of the Capitol dome. Every day an average of 225 people, including 46 children, seek assistance at The Beacon homeless Day Shelter on Madison's near east side.  In downtown Milwaukee, a tent city of the homeless has spread below a tangle of massive freeway overpasses in a city where 5,163 students in the state's largest school district were homeless in 2018.  The La Crosse Collaborative to End Homelessness has identified 275 adults as homeless, a steady number for eight months. In Green Bay, a shelter helps thousands of homeless annually, with one in five between 18 and 24 years old, leaving advocates concerned about where those young people will be in their 30s and 40s. In Beloit schools, nearly 9% of the student population was homeless last school year.  Also deeply troubling is the striking racial disparity in homelessness in Wisconsin. Blacks account for 6.5 percent of the state population but 39 percent of those receiving homeless services in 2018. The disparity is even worse in Dane County, where blacks comprise 5.1 percent of the population but represent 53 percent of those receiving homeless services last year.   Read the full article here

Despite promising efforts, the relentless trauma and indignities of homelessness remain a daily reality for tens of thousands of men, women and children in Wisconsin.

In booming Madison, the homeless live out of vehicles and tents, double up in apartments or motel rooms, or sleep outside on streets lined with posh bars and restaurants surrounding the majestic glow of the Capitol dome. Every day an average of 225 people, including 46 children, seek assistance at The Beacon homeless Day Shelter on Madison's near east side.

In downtown Milwaukee, a tent city of the homeless has spread below a tangle of massive freeway overpasses in a city where 5,163 students in the state's largest school district were homeless in 2018.

The La Crosse Collaborative to End Homelessness has identified 275 adults as homeless, a steady number for eight months. In Green Bay, a shelter helps thousands of homeless annually, with one in five between 18 and 24 years old, leaving advocates concerned about where those young people will be in their 30s and 40s. In Beloit schools, nearly 9% of the student population was homeless last school year.

Also deeply troubling is the striking racial disparity in homelessness in Wisconsin. Blacks account for 6.5 percent of the state population but 39 percent of those receiving homeless services in 2018. The disparity is even worse in Dane County, where blacks comprise 5.1 percent of the population but represent 53 percent of those receiving homeless services last year.

Read the full article here

New York Governor's Homeless Youth Project: Signs Law Mandating Providers Working With Homeless Youth Must Undergo LGBTQ Competency Training, Calling It Common Sense

Governor Andrew Cuomo commemorated National Coming Out Day on October 11 by signing a bill passed by the State Legislature earlier this year mandating that organizations working with homeless youth undergo LGBTQ competency training.  The bill, led in the lower chamber by Brooklyn Assemblymember Felix W. Ortiz and in the upper house by out gay State Senator Brad Hoylman, requires the training for every employee who works in programs or for organizations that provide care to runaway or homeless youth. The training will especially focus on addressing peer-to-peer homophobia and transphobia in shelters, offering support to families of queer youth, and using correct pronouns.  “It’s National Coming Out Day, which is an appropriate time to take action to help our homeless LGBTQ youth,” Hoylman said in a written statement. “With this new law, providers of runaway and homeless youth services across the state will finally have the tools they need to serve LGBTQ kids with the dignity and compassion they deserve.”  Cuomo called the legislation “common sense,” explaining that the state needs to ensure adults who care for young people are equipped with the tools and information necessary to help LGBTQ youth.   Read the full article here

Governor Andrew Cuomo commemorated National Coming Out Day on October 11 by signing a bill passed by the State Legislature earlier this year mandating that organizations working with homeless youth undergo LGBTQ competency training.

The bill, led in the lower chamber by Brooklyn Assemblymember Felix W. Ortiz and in the upper house by out gay State Senator Brad Hoylman, requires the training for every employee who works in programs or for organizations that provide care to runaway or homeless youth. The training will especially focus on addressing peer-to-peer homophobia and transphobia in shelters, offering support to families of queer youth, and using correct pronouns.

“It’s National Coming Out Day, which is an appropriate time to take action to help our homeless LGBTQ youth,” Hoylman said in a written statement. “With this new law, providers of runaway and homeless youth services across the state will finally have the tools they need to serve LGBTQ kids with the dignity and compassion they deserve.”

Cuomo called the legislation “common sense,” explaining that the state needs to ensure adults who care for young people are equipped with the tools and information necessary to help LGBTQ youth.

Read the full article here