Washington State's National Homeless LGBTQ & Minority Youth Project: $1.5M Investment In 10 Selected Areas, 2 In South Florida (MD & PB), 80% Of Homeless Youth Are Non-White Or Biracial

A Way Home America, a national initiative to end youth homelessness, will invest $1.5 million on lowering the number of LGBTQ youth and youth of color without a place to call home.  The goal of the new “Grand Challenge” project is to help 10 cities and counties in the United States develop “targeted strategies to address the problem in their areas.”  The project will begin with five sites in 2019: Richmond, Va., Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Sacramento, Calif.; and San Francisco.  The next cohort will begin in early 2020 with Palm Beach, Fla.; Tucson-Pima, Arizona; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; and Anchorage, Alaska.  “These 10 Grand Challenge communities are committed to centering those young people most likely to experience homelessness – youth of color and LGBTQ youth – and to showing it is possible to effectively end homelessness for all young people,” said Megan Gibbard Kline, director of A Way Home America, in a statement announcing the selected communities. “They are communities unafraid of bold action and systemic change.”   Read full article here

A Way Home America, a national initiative to end youth homelessness, will invest $1.5 million on lowering the number of LGBTQ youth and youth of color without a place to call home.

The goal of the new “Grand Challenge” project is to help 10 cities and counties in the United States develop “targeted strategies to address the problem in their areas.”

The project will begin with five sites in 2019: Richmond, Va., Hennepin County, Minn.; Miami-Dade County, Fla.; Sacramento, Calif.; and San Francisco.

The next cohort will begin in early 2020 with Palm Beach, Fla.; Tucson-Pima, Arizona; Washington, D.C.; Chicago; and Anchorage, Alaska.

“These 10 Grand Challenge communities are committed to centering those young people most likely to experience homelessness – youth of color and LGBTQ youth – and to showing it is possible to effectively end homelessness for all young people,” said Megan Gibbard Kline, director of A Way Home America, in a statement announcing the selected communities. “They are communities unafraid of bold action and systemic change.”

Read full article here