San Francisco Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: $85,000 Funding From City For Case Manager, Assists Homeless Youth Gain Access To Public Housing Dollars To Return Home Safely Or Into Own Apartments

outhside nonprofit organizations are engaging in diverse efforts to help and house the area’s homeless population, especially youth and families. Their work includes assessing families for placement in permanent housing, distributing food, and working with landlords to accept homeless families as tenants. Catholic Charities, Homeless Prenatal Program, Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank, YMCA, among others, collaborate with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing (HSH) and public schools to offer services.  Bayview Access Point, located at 1641 LaSalle Avenue, is an “access point” for families and individuals experiencing homelessness. At access points, City-contracted nonprofits determine whether clients are eligible for shelter and make housing referrals. Bayview Access Point, opened in 2017, is one of three that serve families, along with Mission Access Point and Central City Access Point in the Tenderloin. Unsheltered families that come to an access point are immediately offered temporary housing at a third-party shelter not run by Catholic Charities.  “Our goal is to help at least 70 percent of the families that come to us,” said Rob Strahan, program manager for Catholic Charities’ Bayview Access Point.  Strahan explained that 70 percent of BAP’s clients are at risk of becoming homeless; Catholic Charities helps them stay in their home. The remaining 30 percent are homeless, living in vehicles, tents, and abandoned buildings, who are referred elsewhere for assistance to secure permanent housing, private room shelters, or temporary or permanent relocation outside the City.  HSH’s 2019 point-in-time count found that there are 8,011 people without housing in San Francisco. Catholic Charities estimates that there are currently 600 families at various stages of homelessness working with Access Points.   Read full article here

outhside nonprofit organizations are engaging in diverse efforts to help and house the area’s homeless population, especially youth and families. Their work includes assessing families for placement in permanent housing, distributing food, and working with landlords to accept homeless families as tenants. Catholic Charities, Homeless Prenatal Program, Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank, YMCA, among others, collaborate with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing (HSH) and public schools to offer services.

Bayview Access Point, located at 1641 LaSalle Avenue, is an “access point” for families and individuals experiencing homelessness. At access points, City-contracted nonprofits determine whether clients are eligible for shelter and make housing referrals. Bayview Access Point, opened in 2017, is one of three that serve families, along with Mission Access Point and Central City Access Point in the Tenderloin. Unsheltered families that come to an access point are immediately offered temporary housing at a third-party shelter not run by Catholic Charities.

“Our goal is to help at least 70 percent of the families that come to us,” said Rob Strahan, program manager for Catholic Charities’ Bayview Access Point.

Strahan explained that 70 percent of BAP’s clients are at risk of becoming homeless; Catholic Charities helps them stay in their home. The remaining 30 percent are homeless, living in vehicles, tents, and abandoned buildings, who are referred elsewhere for assistance to secure permanent housing, private room shelters, or temporary or permanent relocation outside the City.

HSH’s 2019 point-in-time count found that there are 8,011 people without housing in San Francisco. Catholic Charities estimates that there are currently 600 families at various stages of homelessness working with Access Points.

Read full article here