Oklahoma City's Homeless Youth Tiny Homes Project: 3 Tiny Homes Completed For Youth Exiting Foster Care Or Homeless, 82 More Tiny Homes Planned With Community Space

A metro non-profit that specializes in helping homeless youth has officially completed their first tiny homes.  With the help of community partners, Pivot has finished three tiny homes on their campus near Northeast 50th Street and Lincoln to house homeless youth.  Eighty-two more tiny homes are planned for the property.  “Totally different than I had imagined. I thought this is going to be totally small,” said Carter, who is thrilled to soon be moving in.  Carter is 19 and aged out of a foster care at 18.  “That day I had to pack up and go to a homeless shelter,” said Carter.  “We want kids to understand how to a be a good neighbor, how to take care of their spaces,” said Pivot President and CEO Jennifer Goodrich.  Student builders with OSU-OKC helped frame out the tiny homes. Building materials, like windows, were donated.  Only one of the homes, the one that's ADA compliant, is larger than 300 square-feet.  A gathering space in the middle will eventually provide laundry services and act as a storm shelter.  Pivot feels youth who have aged out of foster care or are currently homeless and have never been in the foster care system, can live in their tiny home community.  “It’s going to help put me on track and eventually get my own apartment, help learn to provide for myself and be on my own,” said Carter, who expects to graduate early from high school in December.  Pivot is currently fundraising to build the rest of the tiny homes.

A metro non-profit that specializes in helping homeless youth has officially completed their first tiny homes.

With the help of community partners, Pivot has finished three tiny homes on their campus near Northeast 50th Street and Lincoln to house homeless youth.

Eighty-two more tiny homes are planned for the property.

“Totally different than I had imagined. I thought this is going to be totally small,” said Carter, who is thrilled to soon be moving in.

Carter is 19 and aged out of a foster care at 18.

“That day I had to pack up and go to a homeless shelter,” said Carter.

“We want kids to understand how to a be a good neighbor, how to take care of their spaces,” said Pivot President and CEO Jennifer Goodrich.

Student builders with OSU-OKC helped frame out the tiny homes. Building materials, like windows, were donated.

Only one of the homes, the one that's ADA compliant, is larger than 300 square-feet.

A gathering space in the middle will eventually provide laundry services and act as a storm shelter.

Pivot feels youth who have aged out of foster care or are currently homeless and have never been in the foster care system, can live in their tiny home community.

“It’s going to help put me on track and eventually get my own apartment, help learn to provide for myself and be on my own,” said Carter, who expects to graduate early from high school in December.

Pivot is currently fundraising to build the rest of the tiny homes.