Miami (FL) Nonprofit's Homeless Student Project: 96,000 Homeless Students In Florida, 11,968 Students Moved To Florida After Hurricane Maria

Student homelessness in Florida has almost tripled in the last decade to about 96,000 in the 2017-18 school year.  Those experiencing homelessness score lower on statewide assessments and have a lower high school graduation rate compared to students who are economically disadvantaged but have a place to live.  According to a report by Miami Homes for All and the Shimberg Center for Housing Studies at the University of Florida, the lack of affordable housing is one of the main causes of student homelessness.  RELATED: WUSF News Special Report - Growing Unaffordable  While the number of extremely low-income households in Florida has increased by 36% over the last two decades, available and affordable units have decreased by 11%, resulting in multiple families living in one home.  The report defines "homelessness" as:  Doubled-up  Couch surfing  Living in motels, hotels, FEMA trailers, or camp grounds  Living in emergency shelters  Living in transitional housing  Living abandoned in hospitals  Staying in cars, parks, public spaces, vacant buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or other places not designed for sleeping  The student homelessness report indicated that another factor in the growing number of homeless students is recent catastrophic hurricanes, like Maria.   Read full article here

Student homelessness in Florida has almost tripled in the last decade to about 96,000 in the 2017-18 school year.

Those experiencing homelessness score lower on statewide assessments and have a lower high school graduation rate compared to students who are economically disadvantaged but have a place to live.

According to a report by Miami Homes for All and the Shimberg Center for Housing Studies at the University of Florida, the lack of affordable housing is one of the main causes of student homelessness.

RELATED: WUSF News Special Report - Growing Unaffordable

While the number of extremely low-income households in Florida has increased by 36% over the last two decades, available and affordable units have decreased by 11%, resulting in multiple families living in one home.

The report defines "homelessness" as:

Doubled-up

Couch surfing

Living in motels, hotels, FEMA trailers, or camp grounds

Living in emergency shelters

Living in transitional housing

Living abandoned in hospitals

Staying in cars, parks, public spaces, vacant buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or other places not designed for sleeping

The student homelessness report indicated that another factor in the growing number of homeless students is recent catastrophic hurricanes, like Maria.

Read full article here