Sarasota, FL Foster Care Youth Sailing Project: 150 Youth With Average GPA Of 0.6 Defy Homelessness With 95% Graduation Rate, Employable Job Skills And Community Service Work, Sailing As The Platform

A group of foster care children is traveling throughout the state on a boat that doubles as their group home.  http://cbs12.com/news/local/sailfuture-program-offers-foster-care-children-chance-to-learn-live-at-sea  The program is called SailFuture, a non-profit organization that gives four foster care children from Florida, the chance to live at sea.  While on the boat, named “Defy the Odds”, the kids attend an accredited high school, while learning job training, and participating in community service.  The program serves teenage boys ages 15-18.  Corbin Reed, a 17-year-old participant, says “It’s nothing like typical schooling. You’re not just sitting in the chair. It’s more interactive.”  The experience also gives them something they’ve never had, family.  “They understand your pain… and show that they care about you,” says 16-year-old Julian Lafontin.   Reed says he was unhappy with his previous experiences within the foster care system.    “I felt like a number. I didn’t feel like a human.”   The group gives back to the community when they dock. Last month they helped relocate people in the keys who lost everything in Hurricane Irma.  In West Palm Beach they are building homes with Habitat 4 Humanity.  The group is going to Jacksonville next.  SailFuture is working on launching a post-program that helps kids transition after they turn 18."

A group of foster care children is traveling throughout the state on a boat that doubles as their group home.

http://cbs12.com/news/local/sailfuture-program-offers-foster-care-children-chance-to-learn-live-at-sea

The program is called SailFuture, a non-profit organization that gives four foster care children from Florida, the chance to live at sea.

While on the boat, named “Defy the Odds”, the kids attend an accredited high school, while learning job training, and participating in community service.

The program serves teenage boys ages 15-18.

Corbin Reed, a 17-year-old participant, says “It’s nothing like typical schooling. You’re not just sitting in the chair. It’s more interactive.”

The experience also gives them something they’ve never had, family.

“They understand your pain… and show that they care about you,” says 16-year-old Julian Lafontin.

Reed says he was unhappy with his previous experiences within the foster care system.

“I felt like a number. I didn’t feel like a human.”

The group gives back to the community when they dock. Last month they helped relocate people in the keys who lost everything in Hurricane Irma.

In West Palm Beach they are building homes with Habitat 4 Humanity.

The group is going to Jacksonville next.

SailFuture is working on launching a post-program that helps kids transition after they turn 18."