Venice (CA) City's Homeless Youth Project: Council Approves $13.9M Housing Development, Includes 50% Reserved For Permanent Supportive Housing Units For Transition-Aged Youth

Venice Community Housing (VCH) is getting help from the City of Los Angeles to the tune of $13.9 million to redevelop its administrative offices into affordable housing after a motion introduced by Councilmember Mike Bonin was signed into law by Mayor Eric Garcetti.  Earlier this month, City Council approved and Mayor Eric Garcetti signed, $13.9 million in multifamily housing revenue bonds to fund the construction of the Rose Avenue Apartments.  Venice Community Housing (VCH), a non-profit that looks to reduce homelessness and empower low-income constituents in Venice, wants to redevelop what is currently their administrative offices at 718-720 Rose Avenue into the Rose Avenue Apartments. While the redevelopment will include new VCH office space on the first floor, the centerpiece of this project is the inclusion of permanent supportive housing for 34 formerly homeless households. 50 percent of the housing will be for transitional aged youth, and 50 percent will be for those who have experienced chronic homelessness.  “Rose Apartments will help VCH continue to address the overwhelming need for permanent supportive housing for people who are experiencing homelessness or chronic homelessness, especially for those on the Westside of LA, one of the regions most under-served by permanent supportive housing development,” VCH writes on their website.   Read full article here

Venice Community Housing (VCH) is getting help from the City of Los Angeles to the tune of $13.9 million to redevelop its administrative offices into affordable housing after a motion introduced by Councilmember Mike Bonin was signed into law by Mayor Eric Garcetti.

Earlier this month, City Council approved and Mayor Eric Garcetti signed, $13.9 million in multifamily housing revenue bonds to fund the construction of the Rose Avenue Apartments.

Venice Community Housing (VCH), a non-profit that looks to reduce homelessness and empower low-income constituents in Venice, wants to redevelop what is currently their administrative offices at 718-720 Rose Avenue into the Rose Avenue Apartments. While the redevelopment will include new VCH office space on the first floor, the centerpiece of this project is the inclusion of permanent supportive housing for 34 formerly homeless households. 50 percent of the housing will be for transitional aged youth, and 50 percent will be for those who have experienced chronic homelessness.

“Rose Apartments will help VCH continue to address the overwhelming need for permanent supportive housing for people who are experiencing homelessness or chronic homelessness, especially for those on the Westside of LA, one of the regions most under-served by permanent supportive housing development,” VCH writes on their website.

Read full article here

Denver Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: Over 117,000 Text Message Responses To Youth In Crisis, Partners With Hotel Chain To Add Hundreds Of Hotels As Safe Places For Youth In Crisis To Get Help

RLH Corporation  ( RLH ) announced today a collaboration with National Safe Place Network (NSPN) to designate Americas Best Value Inn properties as Safe Place® TXT 4 HELP sites – expanding NSPN’s network and providing more locations in more communities across the country for youth in crisis to go for help. Americas Best Value Inn will be the first national hotel sponsor of the program.   NSPN established and operates Safe Place, a national outreach and prevention program for young people in need of immediate help and safety. Safe Place has expanded their reach to more communities by promoting and utilizing TXT 4 HELP sites, which are available in communities where a “traditional” Safe Place program is not available.  “Unfortunately, in today’s world, young people face family problems, homelessness, bullying, neglect, abuse, and even human trafficking,” said Laurie Jackson, President and CEO of NSPN. “Each year, the Safe Place and TXT 4 HELP programs directly impacts the lives of more than 12,000 youth by providing access to immediate help and safety. TXT 4 HELP has offered real-time assistance to youth in crisis by responding to more than 117,000 incoming text messages since its inception in 2009. We are excited to expand our network now with Americas Best Value Inn locations around the country.”  “National Safe Place Network is a program close to my heart,” said Greg Mount, RLH Corporation President and Chief Executive Officer. “I am proud to have our Americas Best Value Inn locations participate in the program, expanding NSPN’s network, providing more locations in more communities for youth in crisis to go to for help, making a difference and direct impact in our Americas Best Value Inn communities.”   Read full article here

RLH Corporation (RLH) announced today a collaboration with National Safe Place Network (NSPN) to designate Americas Best Value Inn properties as Safe Place® TXT 4 HELP sites – expanding NSPN’s network and providing more locations in more communities across the country for youth in crisis to go for help. Americas Best Value Inn will be the first national hotel sponsor of the program.

NSPN established and operates Safe Place, a national outreach and prevention program for young people in need of immediate help and safety. Safe Place has expanded their reach to more communities by promoting and utilizing TXT 4 HELP sites, which are available in communities where a “traditional” Safe Place program is not available.

“Unfortunately, in today’s world, young people face family problems, homelessness, bullying, neglect, abuse, and even human trafficking,” said Laurie Jackson, President and CEO of NSPN. “Each year, the Safe Place and TXT 4 HELP programs directly impacts the lives of more than 12,000 youth by providing access to immediate help and safety. TXT 4 HELP has offered real-time assistance to youth in crisis by responding to more than 117,000 incoming text messages since its inception in 2009. We are excited to expand our network now with Americas Best Value Inn locations around the country.”

“National Safe Place Network is a program close to my heart,” said Greg Mount, RLH Corporation President and Chief Executive Officer. “I am proud to have our Americas Best Value Inn locations participate in the program, expanding NSPN’s network, providing more locations in more communities for youth in crisis to go to for help, making a difference and direct impact in our Americas Best Value Inn communities.”

Read full article here

San Francisco Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: $85,000 Funding From City For Case Manager, Assists Homeless Youth Gain Access To Public Housing Dollars To Return Home Safely Or Into Own Apartments

outhside nonprofit organizations are engaging in diverse efforts to help and house the area’s homeless population, especially youth and families. Their work includes assessing families for placement in permanent housing, distributing food, and working with landlords to accept homeless families as tenants. Catholic Charities, Homeless Prenatal Program, Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank, YMCA, among others, collaborate with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing (HSH) and public schools to offer services.  Bayview Access Point, located at 1641 LaSalle Avenue, is an “access point” for families and individuals experiencing homelessness. At access points, City-contracted nonprofits determine whether clients are eligible for shelter and make housing referrals. Bayview Access Point, opened in 2017, is one of three that serve families, along with Mission Access Point and Central City Access Point in the Tenderloin. Unsheltered families that come to an access point are immediately offered temporary housing at a third-party shelter not run by Catholic Charities.  “Our goal is to help at least 70 percent of the families that come to us,” said Rob Strahan, program manager for Catholic Charities’ Bayview Access Point.  Strahan explained that 70 percent of BAP’s clients are at risk of becoming homeless; Catholic Charities helps them stay in their home. The remaining 30 percent are homeless, living in vehicles, tents, and abandoned buildings, who are referred elsewhere for assistance to secure permanent housing, private room shelters, or temporary or permanent relocation outside the City.  HSH’s 2019 point-in-time count found that there are 8,011 people without housing in San Francisco. Catholic Charities estimates that there are currently 600 families at various stages of homelessness working with Access Points.   Read full article here

outhside nonprofit organizations are engaging in diverse efforts to help and house the area’s homeless population, especially youth and families. Their work includes assessing families for placement in permanent housing, distributing food, and working with landlords to accept homeless families as tenants. Catholic Charities, Homeless Prenatal Program, Potrero Hill Neighborhood House, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank, YMCA, among others, collaborate with the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing (HSH) and public schools to offer services.

Bayview Access Point, located at 1641 LaSalle Avenue, is an “access point” for families and individuals experiencing homelessness. At access points, City-contracted nonprofits determine whether clients are eligible for shelter and make housing referrals. Bayview Access Point, opened in 2017, is one of three that serve families, along with Mission Access Point and Central City Access Point in the Tenderloin. Unsheltered families that come to an access point are immediately offered temporary housing at a third-party shelter not run by Catholic Charities.

“Our goal is to help at least 70 percent of the families that come to us,” said Rob Strahan, program manager for Catholic Charities’ Bayview Access Point.

Strahan explained that 70 percent of BAP’s clients are at risk of becoming homeless; Catholic Charities helps them stay in their home. The remaining 30 percent are homeless, living in vehicles, tents, and abandoned buildings, who are referred elsewhere for assistance to secure permanent housing, private room shelters, or temporary or permanent relocation outside the City.

HSH’s 2019 point-in-time count found that there are 8,011 people without housing in San Francisco. Catholic Charities estimates that there are currently 600 families at various stages of homelessness working with Access Points.

Read full article here

Colorado Housing Authority's Foster Care Youth Project: Launches 1st Of 2 Nationwide New Foster Care Housing Voucher Programs, 25% Of Foster Youth Experience Homelessness With 4 Yrs Of Aging Out

Thousands of foster kids who age out of the program end up homeless each year, but a new federal initiative is designed to help them make the transition by helping youth afford stable housing.  The nationwide Foster Youth Independence initiative, a new Housing and Urban Development program, is designed to help youth aging out of foster care transition into independence by helping offset some of their housing costs. The Garfield County Housing Authority is one of the first two in the country to take on the program.  “About 20,000 youth age out of foster care each year,” Evelyn Lim, HUD regional administrator said in an announcement earlier this week.  Of those 20,000, 25% will be homeless during their first four years on their own, estimates the National Center for Housing and Child Welfare. A much higher percentage will be “precariously housed,” Lim said.  K.T. Gazunis, executive director of the Garfield County Housing Authority, thanked the HUD staff who made the trip to Western Colorado, as well as HUD Secretary Ben Carson, who grew up in public housing and became a brain surgeon at Johns Hopkins.   Read full article here

Thousands of foster kids who age out of the program end up homeless each year, but a new federal initiative is designed to help them make the transition by helping youth afford stable housing.

The nationwide Foster Youth Independence initiative, a new Housing and Urban Development program, is designed to help youth aging out of foster care transition into independence by helping offset some of their housing costs. The Garfield County Housing Authority is one of the first two in the country to take on the program.

“About 20,000 youth age out of foster care each year,” Evelyn Lim, HUD regional administrator said in an announcement earlier this week.

Of those 20,000, 25% will be homeless during their first four years on their own, estimates the National Center for Housing and Child Welfare. A much higher percentage will be “precariously housed,” Lim said.

K.T. Gazunis, executive director of the Garfield County Housing Authority, thanked the HUD staff who made the trip to Western Colorado, as well as HUD Secretary Ben Carson, who grew up in public housing and became a brain surgeon at Johns Hopkins.

Read full article here