San Francisco's LGBTQ Homeless Youth Project: $3 Million Budget Proposal With $2 Million For 75 Transgender & Gender-Nonconforming Youth, $425,000 For Transgender Services & LGBTQ Host Homes

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San Francisco Mayor London Breed has proposed more than $3 million over the next two years for transgender initiatives and LGBTQ services, including $2 million specifically earmarked for housing subsidies for transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals.

https://ebar.com/news/news/276893

The proposal is in Breed's two-year budget plan, which she is expected to release Friday, May 31.

The announcement reflects the goals of Our Trans Home SF, a proposal by trans advocates and the city's Office of Transgender Initiatives. The Bay Area Reporter previously reported that Our Trans Home SF requested close to $1 million for the housing subsidies.

With the city's two-year budget cycle, that appears to be what the mayor incorporated into her spending blueprint. The $2 million will fund a two-year pilot program to provide housing subsidies to 75 transgender individuals, according to the mayor's office, which said the funding would create the first program of its kind in the nation.

"We are inspired and grateful for Mayor Breed's ongoing commitment to our trans and LGBTQ communities," Clair Farley, director of the Office of Transgender Initiatives, said in a statement released by the mayor's office. "Trans communities have spearheaded a call for TGNC-specific housing programs through the Our Trans Home SF campaign to assure TGNC individuals can find and keep their housing."

Farley also said that "one out of two TGNC San Franciscans have experienced homelessness."

"When TGNC San Franciscans do experience homelessness, there is no safe places for us to go," Farley, a trans woman, added.

Another part of the mayor's proposal is to launch an LGBTQ Host Homes program through the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. It's an initiative for transitional aged youth, or TAY, and will be operated by the San Francisco LGBT Community Center, the mayor's office stated.

The center will connect youth experiencing homelessness to safe and stable housing with adult hosts in the community, utilizing existing housing stock. Assistance will be available for between three and 12 months, the mayor's office stated.

"For decades, San Franciscans have opened their homes to provide shelter and support to LGBTQ youth who have been rejected by their families of origin," said Roberto Ordeñana, deputy executive director of the SF LGBT center in an email to the B.A.R.

"Investment in the SF LGBT Center's Host Homes program allows us to create a solid structure and framework to build off this cultural tradition and leverage the power of community. With this launch, we will immediately reduce the impact of homelessness on participating LGBTQ youth aged 18 to 24, while we continue to collaborate with the city and our partners to ensure that San Francisco has a wide range of services to improve housing options that meet the growing demand from some of the most vulnerable members of our community," Ordeñana said.

Gay District 8 Supervisor Rafael Mandelman told the B.A.R in an emailed reply that he supports the mayor's funding request for the various programs. He noted that the needs were a focal point during a recent hearing he called to see how city departments were collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data in order to meet the needs of the city's LGBTQ community.

"Our trans community is disproportionately impacted by our housing and homelessness crisis but hasn't gotten the support they need from City Hall. Trans and gender non-conforming San Franciscans made their demands for housing clear with the Our Trans Home SF campaign, and I'm grateful to the mayor for hearing the call and supporting the urgent housing needs of this community."

HSH's budget also includes $425,000 for transgender services for youth experiencing homelessness, focusing on problem-solving and family reunification interventions, based on a peer-to-peer service model and additional training for nonprofit providers operating shelters that serve LGBTQ youth.

"Transgender and gender-nonconforming San Franciscans are almost 18 times more likely to experience homelessness than the general population in our city," Breed said in the release. "Housing subsidies and navigation services for our city's trans community will help individuals remain housed and will provide a much-needed safety net for those who are at risk of homelessness.

"With the ongoing affordability crisis in our city and the constant attacks on trans people from the White House we must remain united to make sure no one is erased," Breed added, referring to multiple attacks on the trans community from the Trump administration. "This budget proposal shows that we're committed to keeping our communities housed and assuring our most vulnerable residents can thrive in San Francisco."

According to the mayor's office, nearly half of the homeless youth in San Francisco identify as LGBTQ and 30% of homeless adults identify as LGBTQ.

Other items in Breed's budget document include a new training officer for the Office of Transgender Initiatives to implement Breed's executive directive to track the expansion of gender options on all city forms and provide trans inclusion training to city employees who work with the public; establishing an ongoing LGBTQ immigrant fellowship program through the trans initiatives office; and continuing to backfill federal HIV funding cuts and supporting the city's Getting to Zero initiative to reduce HIV transmission.

The announcement follows a year of planning from Breed regarding the prioritization of the needs of queer and trans youth specifically on the issue of homelessness in this population, and delivering on promises made by the late Mayor Ed Lee.

Topeka (KS) Nonprofit's Youth Exiting Foster Care Project: 3-Story, 11 Unit Apartment Building For Young Women Exiting Care, $780,000 Cap Raise For Expansion, Sliding Scale Rent For Empowerment

By Tina Carter’s estimate, she has taken in more than 100 foster children over the past two decades, starting when she lived in the Denver suburb of Aurora, Colorado.   https://www.cjonline.com/news/20190531/faith-based-organization-seeks-to-help-young-women-who-age-out-of-foster-care   “I’ve been a foster care provider for 22 years,” Carter said earlier this week. “I didn’t go out to be a foster parent. I was a youth worker, and one of the girls in our church got put in a shelter. I went and got her, and it snowballed after that. It just kept coming.”  Carter said as she took children into her home, she became concerned about the well-being of the girls who aged out of the foster care system once they reached age 18. Many, she said, had no family support and were faced with the challenges of living on their own at a young age.  Carter, 57, said she launched a nonprofit called You Can Begin Again in 2010 while she was still living in Colorado. The objective was to provide a residential living facility for young women ages 18 to 25 who had been in foster care but were now out on their own.  Leaders of You Can Begin Again, which Carter said is a faith-based organization, would work with the young women, helping them learn how to find jobs, budget their money and become self-sufficient before being able to set out on their own.  In the process, she said, the program can help young women avoid becoming homeless, victims of human trafficking or incarcerated after being caught stealing things like food from stores.  After moving to Topeka, Carter in November 2018 started a new location for You Can Begin Again at a three-story, 11-unit apartment building at 1316 S.W. Western that she is leasing exclusively for her program.  She said she has five young women in the program at present,but is looking for more participants.  “I have four openings that I need to fill by the end of June,” she said. “We’re the only ones who can use the property, and we don’t want the owner to give the property away.”  She said another program, called You Can Begin Again Too, is designed for young women who aged out of foster care and who have young children.  Those in the program live rent-free for the first six months, paying only their share of utilities. After six months, the women pay $150 a month for rent. Then, after 18 months, the rent increases to $250 a month. The goal is to help the young women gain control of their finances.  “We’re not enabling the young women,” said Carter, who serves as executive director of You Can Begin Again. “We’re empowering young women.”  Still, the program needs donations to remain afloat. Carter said she has started Project 3000 as a fundraising arm of the organization. The goal of the fundraiser is to find 3,000 people who will donate $5 per week, $20 per month or $260 per year.  “We’re trying to let people know we’re here,” said Carter, who works full time at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas. “We can’t do it by ourselves.”  As this is a fairly new area of social service work, she said, not many grants are available.  She said she would like to see the program expand to other Kansas communities and hire additional staff members to help run the various residential facilities.  Since starting in Topeka, she said, “We’ve had our ups and we’ve had our downs. We’re ironing out all the wrinkles.”  A member of Open Arms Outreach Ministries church, 2401 S.E. 11th, Carter said You Can Begin Again is a way for her to put her faith into action.  “It’s just my heart,” she said. “I’m a missionary.  “If Jesus wasn’t in it, I wouldn’t be doing it. He’s the one who keeps me grounded through all the trials. I can do anything and everything because he’s involved.”  Carter said she has one biological daughter and one adopted daughter. But she actually considers herself to have seven daughters and three sons, including children she cared for through foster care who have remained a part of her family.  One of the young women she has taken under her wing is helping her at You Can Begin Again.  Rachel Thomas, 30, who met Carter in Colorado, is assisting with the young women in the Topeka program.  Thomas said You Can Begin Again takes a hands-on approach in working with young women, helping to meet their needs so they can become self-sufficient.  For more information, call Carter at 720-300-0029 or visit www.youcanbeginagain.org.

By Tina Carter’s estimate, she has taken in more than 100 foster children over the past two decades, starting when she lived in the Denver suburb of Aurora, Colorado.

https://www.cjonline.com/news/20190531/faith-based-organization-seeks-to-help-young-women-who-age-out-of-foster-care

“I’ve been a foster care provider for 22 years,” Carter said earlier this week. “I didn’t go out to be a foster parent. I was a youth worker, and one of the girls in our church got put in a shelter. I went and got her, and it snowballed after that. It just kept coming.”

Carter said as she took children into her home, she became concerned about the well-being of the girls who aged out of the foster care system once they reached age 18. Many, she said, had no family support and were faced with the challenges of living on their own at a young age.

Carter, 57, said she launched a nonprofit called You Can Begin Again in 2010 while she was still living in Colorado. The objective was to provide a residential living facility for young women ages 18 to 25 who had been in foster care but were now out on their own.

Leaders of You Can Begin Again, which Carter said is a faith-based organization, would work with the young women, helping them learn how to find jobs, budget their money and become self-sufficient before being able to set out on their own.

In the process, she said, the program can help young women avoid becoming homeless, victims of human trafficking or incarcerated after being caught stealing things like food from stores.

After moving to Topeka, Carter in November 2018 started a new location for You Can Begin Again at a three-story, 11-unit apartment building at 1316 S.W. Western that she is leasing exclusively for her program.

She said she has five young women in the program at present,but is looking for more participants.

“I have four openings that I need to fill by the end of June,” she said. “We’re the only ones who can use the property, and we don’t want the owner to give the property away.”

She said another program, called You Can Begin Again Too, is designed for young women who aged out of foster care and who have young children.

Those in the program live rent-free for the first six months, paying only their share of utilities. After six months, the women pay $150 a month for rent. Then, after 18 months, the rent increases to $250 a month. The goal is to help the young women gain control of their finances.

“We’re not enabling the young women,” said Carter, who serves as executive director of You Can Begin Again. “We’re empowering young women.”

Still, the program needs donations to remain afloat. Carter said she has started Project 3000 as a fundraising arm of the organization. The goal of the fundraiser is to find 3,000 people who will donate $5 per week, $20 per month or $260 per year.

“We’re trying to let people know we’re here,” said Carter, who works full time at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas. “We can’t do it by ourselves.”

As this is a fairly new area of social service work, she said, not many grants are available.

She said she would like to see the program expand to other Kansas communities and hire additional staff members to help run the various residential facilities.

Since starting in Topeka, she said, “We’ve had our ups and we’ve had our downs. We’re ironing out all the wrinkles.”

A member of Open Arms Outreach Ministries church, 2401 S.E. 11th, Carter said You Can Begin Again is a way for her to put her faith into action.

“It’s just my heart,” she said. “I’m a missionary.

“If Jesus wasn’t in it, I wouldn’t be doing it. He’s the one who keeps me grounded through all the trials. I can do anything and everything because he’s involved.”

Carter said she has one biological daughter and one adopted daughter. But she actually considers herself to have seven daughters and three sons, including children she cared for through foster care who have remained a part of her family.

One of the young women she has taken under her wing is helping her at You Can Begin Again.

Rachel Thomas, 30, who met Carter in Colorado, is assisting with the young women in the Topeka program.

Thomas said You Can Begin Again takes a hands-on approach in working with young women, helping to meet their needs so they can become self-sufficient.

For more information, call Carter at 720-300-0029 or visit www.youcanbeginagain.org.

Portland (OR) Nonprofit's Homeless Youth Project: Self-Esteem & Mental Health Primary Predictors Of Well-Being Which Leads To Better Housing Outcomes, Many Organizations Have The Wrong Approach

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Service providers for youth experiencing homelessness typically focus on the big three: food, shelter and health care. But a new study from Portland State University Community Psychology graduate student Katricia Stewart shows overall well-being is just as important.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-05-self-esteem-key-success-portland-homeless.html

She published her study, "Intrapersonal and Social-contextual Factors Related to Psychological Well-being Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness," with her advisor Greg Townley in the Journal of Community Psychology earlier this year. This work was funded by a student research grant awarded to Stewart by APA Division 27, the Society for Community Research and Action.

"In the end, they're still just kids and young adults who need to enjoy themselves and have creative outlets and make friends," Stewart said. "There needs to be a balance between serving those basic needs and having opportunities to just be a young adult."

Stewart argues that focusing only on food, shelter and health care above all else isn't the best way to serve youth experiencing homelessness.

"While those fundamentals are important, so are opportunities for youth to cultivate community, develop supportive relationships, and engage in meaningful hobbies," she said.

Stewart studied components of well-being—including self-esteem, mental health, sense of community and empowerment—and which factors made a difference in the day-to-day lives of homeless youth.

While all the factors are important, Stewart said self-esteem and mental health stood out as the primary predictors of psychological well-being.

"Greater self-esteem predicted greater psychological well-being, which makes sense when you consider the age group—18 to 24 years old—who are in a time in life when identity and self-esteem are important parts of development," she said.

Many of the 100 Portland youth surveyed for Stewart's study stated they were homeless because they were either kicked out of their home or chose to leave; were managing personal issues like drug use or pregnancy; or struggled financially.

Further, many were living in unhealthy or abusive environments and battling with a difference in family beliefs or values.

These circumstances might contribute to youth feeling dis-empowered, Stewart said.

"However, if supported in the right way, they can develop a stronger sense of empowerment and self-worth," she said. "This, in turn, might be one of the many important factors in changing the trajectory of their lives."

Building their self-esteem and helping them recognize they can take action to improve their situations is one factor at play; service providers can also help youth identify and pursue opportunities or skills that support their future—such as education, housing, or employment, she added.

p:ear, a Portland nonprofit providing educational, artistic and recreational opportunities to youth experiencing homelessness, worked with Stewart during the study. She identified p:ear as an example of a service provider examining the bigger picture and helping youth make strides in overall wellness.

"They provide a space for youth to build confidence and develop themselves, pursue activities and do things that can make them feel good about themselves," she said. That includes access to art, job skills training and recreational activities.

Stewart hopes her findings will help inform future research and program development at homeless service centers. She looks forward to opportunities to continue working with p:ear and with youth experiencing homelessness in her role as a graduate student research assistant with PSU's Homelessness Research & Action Collaborative beginning this summer.

Kaiser Permanente's Homeless Youth Project: Over $20 Million Awarded To Nonprofit's For Workforce Programs, Foster Youth High Priority For Funding School, Job & Housing Assistance

Kaiser Permanente has awarded over $20 million to programs that address and support young people’s social determinants of health.   https://healthitanalytics.com/news/kaiser-permanente-gives-20m-to-social-determinants-programs   The grants will go to community-based and national charitable organizations that offer education and job training to young people from underrepresented and low-income communities. The donations demonstrate Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to addressing the non-clinical factors that impact population health.  “As a mission-based nonprofit organization, we have the responsibility to look at the big picture when it comes to community health,” said Cynthia Telles, PhD, Community Health Committee chair for Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals Boards of Directors. “We know that education, training, and good jobs are important to the health of our communities.”  The grants include funding for the Workforce Development Council for Seattle-King County, a nonprofit workforce organization that oversees employment-related programs for youth, the adult workforce, and employers in Seattle-King County.  The Workforce Development Council (WDC) will work with education, business, and community organizations to create a pathway to apprenticeship and multi-trade apprenticeship programs. Homeless youth, young parents, and youth who have been in foster care or juvenile justice systems will receive high priority for this program.  “This program will connect young people to basic needs such as stable housing, transportation, and childcare,” said Dot Fallihee, interim CEO of the WDC. “We’ll provide targeted training with placements into apprenticeships in manufacturing and health care, which will offer opportunities to improve their wages, stability, and overall health.”  Kaiser Permanente will also award funding to the Oakland Unified School District’s Thriving Students Initiative to expand the district's Community Schools model and sustain the African American Male Achievement Program, a nationally recognized initiative designed to improve academic and life outcomes for African American male students in Oakland.  The grant will also serve to strengthen school-based health centers and address the recent increase in student homelessness.  Community Health Councils will benefit from the Kaiser Permanente grants as well. The donation will implement a Youth of Color Workforce Development Pipeline program, which will help low-income students in South Los Angeles prepare for jobs in local community health centers.  These grants will add to Kaiser Permanente’s many efforts to address and support individuals’ social determinants of health. In March 2019, the organization partnered with Community Solutions to leverage real-time data and end chronic homelessness in 15 communities. Kaiser Permanente will donate $3 million over three years to Community Solutions’ Build for Zero Initiative, a program that helps local leaders better understand homelessness in the communities they serve.  “Kaiser Permanente is investing in efforts to reduce homelessness and housing insecurity because there is a proven link between housing and health,” Kaiser Permanente Chairman and CEO Bernard J. Tyson said at the time.  “Addressing affordable housing and homelessness is crucial to Kaiser Permanente’s mission to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve, and to advance the economic, social and environmental conditions for health.”  More recently, the organization announced that it would be developing a first-of-its-kind program to connect all its members to resources that address the social determinants of health. The Thrive Local initiative will integrate traditional clinical care with mental healthcare and community services, providing comprehensive support for individuals struggling with housing, food insecurity, and other issues.  “Kaiser Permanente has long understood that total health can only be achieved through a combination of physical, mental and social care,” Tyson said at the time.  “In order to thrive, people need access to the things that are vital to health such as secure housing and nutritious food. Our unique mission to improve not only the health of our members, but also that of our communities, drives us to undertake impactful initiatives like Thrive Local to connect our communities with the services they need. This is one of our bold moves.”  With these new grants, Kaiser Permanente expects to support individuals’ social determinants and improve their overall health and wellbeing.  “We are excited to help young people in our communities who have faced great obstacles to finishing school and finding stable work,” said Bechara Choucair, MD, Kaiser Permanente chief community health officer. “These grants will help them further their education and improve their economic situation, and ultimately their health.”

Kaiser Permanente has awarded over $20 million to programs that address and support young people’s social determinants of health.

https://healthitanalytics.com/news/kaiser-permanente-gives-20m-to-social-determinants-programs

The grants will go to community-based and national charitable organizations that offer education and job training to young people from underrepresented and low-income communities. The donations demonstrate Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to addressing the non-clinical factors that impact population health.

“As a mission-based nonprofit organization, we have the responsibility to look at the big picture when it comes to community health,” said Cynthia Telles, PhD, Community Health Committee chair for Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals Boards of Directors. “We know that education, training, and good jobs are important to the health of our communities.”

The grants include funding for the Workforce Development Council for Seattle-King County, a nonprofit workforce organization that oversees employment-related programs for youth, the adult workforce, and employers in Seattle-King County.

The Workforce Development Council (WDC) will work with education, business, and community organizations to create a pathway to apprenticeship and multi-trade apprenticeship programs. Homeless youth, young parents, and youth who have been in foster care or juvenile justice systems will receive high priority for this program.

“This program will connect young people to basic needs such as stable housing, transportation, and childcare,” said Dot Fallihee, interim CEO of the WDC. “We’ll provide targeted training with placements into apprenticeships in manufacturing and health care, which will offer opportunities to improve their wages, stability, and overall health.”

Kaiser Permanente will also award funding to the Oakland Unified School District’s Thriving Students Initiative to expand the district's Community Schools model and sustain the African American Male Achievement Program, a nationally recognized initiative designed to improve academic and life outcomes for African American male students in Oakland.

The grant will also serve to strengthen school-based health centers and address the recent increase in student homelessness.

Community Health Councils will benefit from the Kaiser Permanente grants as well. The donation will implement a Youth of Color Workforce Development Pipeline program, which will help low-income students in South Los Angeles prepare for jobs in local community health centers.

These grants will add to Kaiser Permanente’s many efforts to address and support individuals’ social determinants of health. In March 2019, the organization partnered with Community Solutions to leverage real-time data and end chronic homelessness in 15 communities. Kaiser Permanente will donate $3 million over three years to Community Solutions’ Build for Zero Initiative, a program that helps local leaders better understand homelessness in the communities they serve.

“Kaiser Permanente is investing in efforts to reduce homelessness and housing insecurity because there is a proven link between housing and health,” Kaiser Permanente Chairman and CEO Bernard J. Tyson said at the time.

“Addressing affordable housing and homelessness is crucial to Kaiser Permanente’s mission to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve, and to advance the economic, social and environmental conditions for health.”

More recently, the organization announced that it would be developing a first-of-its-kind program to connect all its members to resources that address the social determinants of health. The Thrive Local initiative will integrate traditional clinical care with mental healthcare and community services, providing comprehensive support for individuals struggling with housing, food insecurity, and other issues.

“Kaiser Permanente has long understood that total health can only be achieved through a combination of physical, mental and social care,” Tyson said at the time.

“In order to thrive, people need access to the things that are vital to health such as secure housing and nutritious food. Our unique mission to improve not only the health of our members, but also that of our communities, drives us to undertake impactful initiatives like Thrive Local to connect our communities with the services they need. This is one of our bold moves.”

With these new grants, Kaiser Permanente expects to support individuals’ social determinants and improve their overall health and wellbeing.

“We are excited to help young people in our communities who have faced great obstacles to finishing school and finding stable work,” said Bechara Choucair, MD, Kaiser Permanente chief community health officer. “These grants will help them further their education and improve their economic situation, and ultimately their health.”